Archive for leadership SmartBlogs

Does a leader need an enemy to succeed?

Leaders run risks when they act on the negative. Negativity may win an election but it does not lead to good governance. A leader must stand for something, not simply against something else. Having an enemy can help when gaining attention for a cause, but using that enemy and hatred of it, as a foundation for leadership is a risky proposition.[…] Continue Reading »

Feedback, as Marshall Goldsmith taught me, is a gift. And as such we need to thank people when they deliver it to us.

It is not enough to say thank you. You also need to learn to accept it — and act up on it.

When the feedback is coming from a trusted source — even if we don’t like that individual — it should be considered, and changes made.[…] Continue Reading »

It takes a strong person to speak truth to power. And so leaders need to surround themselves with strong people, unafraid to tell the boss – the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Leaders need to make it safe for those who give feedback. They should invite push-back, to welcome people who disagree, and, in fact, to reward them for doing so.[…] Continue Reading »

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How well do you recognize when something will “trigger” you in a negative way?

  • Extremely well — I know my triggers and mitigate them before they happen: 11.37%
  • Very well — I recognize when I’m being triggered and act accordingly: 47.56%
  • Well — I can recover quickly when I’m triggered: 25.99%
  • Not well — I have trouble reacting well when I’m triggered: 14.15%
  • Poorly — I’m not aware I’ve been triggered until after the damage is done: .93%

Mindfulness matters.[…] Continue Reading »

“We can meet or we can work. We can’t do both.” ~ Dan Altobello, business leader

It is estimated that senior executives spend 50% to 75% of their time in meetings with each other. In my work, I hear good people say, “I see our top managers maybe two or three times a year, in the lobby of our building.”

This is why 70% of our people do not feel fully engaged, why morale is generally low.[…] Continue Reading »