R+ Book 5th edition print cover v4The following is an excerpt from “Performance Management: Changing Behavior That Drives Organizational Effectiveness,” Fifth Edition, revised, by Aubrey C. Daniels, PhD., and Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D., for Performance Management Publications, a division of Aubrey Daniels International Inc.

Success in business is defined by an organization’s ability to produce results. If you don’t make a profit, you will go out of business. The same is true for each managerial position within your organization. If a manager does not produce results, he/she will not be judged as successful.

All organizational results are the products of human behavior. Every result is produced by someone doing something. If you want to improve results, you must first get employees to change what they are doing. You want people to do some things either more or less often, or in some cases, to do something entirely different.

To change results, you must change behavior. (read more…)

Of course you’re already a good boss, or you wouldn’t be reading this article. You may even be a great boss. But how do you stay at the top of your game? You do it by modeling great boss behavior on a daily basis.

Of course, you don’t get up every morning, look at that face in the mirror, and proclaim, “I’m going to be a great boss today.” Instead, you spend a little time on introspection and make some key personal decisions. Once you have created the internal foundation, you will more naturally do what a great boss does and you’ll be able to grow your people by showing them the way. Begin by asking yourself these three questions:

  • Where are you going?
  • Who’s going with you?
  • How are you going to get there?

But wait — how will you find time for this? It’s so easy to get stuck in the day-to-day rut. (read more…)

Trust is nearly synonymous with leadership. And it’s big business. We buy books (from the selection of more than 80,000 about trust on Amazon. We attend seminars. And we work diligently to cultivate it with employees, peers, supervisors, customers — heck, everyone we know. But field research suggests that real and lasting trust may depend less on what we do and more on what we don’t do.

What our parents told us growing up is true: years of trustworthy behavior and trust-building efforts can unravel easily — sometimes with just one act. In fact, employees report that undermining trust is as simple a performing any of these top trust terminators.

Lie

Making untrue, inaccurate statements is only the tip of the iceberg. To employees, fibbing by omission (editing out or withholding something) is as bad as lying by commission (intentionally spreading false information.) As hard as it may sometimes be, candid straight talk is the foundation of trust, relationships and results. (read more…)

This post is an excerpt from “Communicate to Inspire” (February 2014, Kogan Page) by Kevin Murray.

Communicate to Inspire Be yourself better

Authenticity as a leader is crucial. Followers will not commit if they do not trust you and believe that you have integrity. So, even if you are a highly introverted individual, you will have to learn to speak with more passion, talk to your values and stand up more often to speak to your beliefs. Followers must feel your passion and believe that you believe. When you are clear with yourself about the things you really care about, you cannot help but talk to them with passion.

Most leaders have not spent the time articulating those beliefs, yet the ability to draw on and display that passion and commitment, consistently and predictably, counts for more than skills at oratory and communicates more effectively than even the most perfectly crafted words. You have to be true to yourself, but you also have to learn to ‘perform’ yourself better. (read more…)

 

Veterinarian Lance S. Fox knew a good bit about climbing mountains even before he started his trek to Mount Everest, thanks to his time in veterinary school. Dr. Fox will be speaking at this summer’s AVMA Annual Convention, where members of the American Veterinary Medical Association will gather for the latest in veterinary medicine, and Animal Health SmartBrief asked for a sneak peek of his talk and a window into his life-changing trek to the Himalayas and up Mount Everest, documented in his book, “No Place but UP!” Dr. Fox obtained his veterinary degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, and he has worked in private practice and now serves as technical director in North America with the Animal Nutrition & Health division of DSM. You can learn more at his website.

A DVM’s perspective on the highest point on Earth …

I knew Everest would be hard, second only to making it through veterinary school. (read more…)