The Young Entrepreneur Council is an invite-only organization composed of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC launched BusinessCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. Read previous SmartBlogs posts by YEC.

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I need to “break up” with a business partner. Beyond the legal considerations, what can I do to approach this delicate situation successfully?

yec_Matt Doyle1. Be as honest as possible

This is always a hard situation, but nothing makes it harder on the person being let go than not getting honesty from the person they’ve fought beside and endured the same hardships with. Let them know exactly why they can’t be a part of this anymore, and have evidence to back it up. Those who truly cared about the business will often see reason. (read more…)

Aon’s most recent “Trends in Global Employee Engagement” reprises a familiar refrain:

“Companies continue to struggle with providing growth opportunities for employees and other top engagement drivers. Career opportunities is the top engagement driver globally; however, positive perceptions surrounding this driver have fallen 3 points, to 44%”

Yet again, organizations, talent professionals and leaders have to face the hard data and hard reality that we’ve still not cracked the code on what matters most to employees: career opportunities. It’s not for lack of effort. Companies are investing extraordinary resources in skills training, portals, online systems and processes designed to make this happen. And it all falls short. Here’s why.

Dated definitions: We continue to hold tightly to and perpetuate the illusion that career development operates via the old career ladder, which (in days gone by) allowed for the regular, progressive and consistent movement upward toward increasingly desirable positions. Unfortunately, the ladder no longer exists. (read more…)

“When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion.” ~Dale Carnegie

Chip Kelly caught the NFL by storm when he took over as Philadelphia Eagles head coach before the 2013 season following a successful run in college. Less than three years later, a perceived lack of emotional intelligence on Kelly’s part was largely to blame for his firing with one game left on the Eagles’ regular season schedule.

During the press conference, CEO Jeffrey Lurie spoke about his vision for the team’s next leader. “You’ve got to open your heart to players and everybody you want to achieve peak performance,” Lurie said. “I would call it a style of leadership that values information and all of the resources that are provided and at the same time values emotional intelligence. I think in today’s world, a combination of all those factors creates the best chance to succeed.”

Oftentimes, the biggest obstacle for a new leader has little to do with how well she knows the job or whether she possesses the right technical skills. (read more…)

Have you ever been to a Michelin-starred restaurant? The Michelin Guide was created in 1900 to recognize world-renowned restaurants. Today, its highest-rated 3-star establishments total only 84 worldwide.

While the cuisine gets these restaurants on the Michelin map, it’s not always what keeps them there. It takes innovation, exceptional service, and most importantly, the right people to ensure a restaurant keeps its Michelin stars. The Wall Street Journal has reported on the attention to detail required to retain a position as a server at these restaurants:

“Waiters are expected to be at ease and in command of a wide range of facts and skills. In a 16-course dinner at Eleven Madison Park, a single plate might have 15 ingredients and five preparations. … Servers are expected to have accurate answers to specific questions about food allergens, the type of sea salt in a particular dish or the origin of the duck. (read more…)

You can learn a lot about thriving in your job from a poet.

I know that, as a savvy businessperson, that might seem incongruous. After all, what can someone who dabbles in words and the elegant turn of phrase tell you about revenue growth and bottom lines, about market penetration and innovation, or about slogging through the tortuous political landscape of a company that’s reducing headcount? You’re right. Absolutely nothing!

Yet a recent re-reading of David Whyte’s book “The Three Marriages” reminded me of just how much art informs life. In the book, Whyte posits that we all have responsibility for three marriages in our lives: with our inner selves, with our loved ones and with our work. Separating those marriages, he says, destroys the foundation of the happiness we deserve. But, when we embrace those marriages in an integrative way, we can bring our best selves to each of them. (read more…)