Archive for successionplanning SmartBlogs

I once worked with a leader who turned around his perspective of one of his employees. This employee was skilled but was critical of the leader. When the leader had to find someone to fill in while he left the organization for several months, he saw something in this challenging individual that told him that this was the one to take care of things while he was absent.[…] Continue Reading »

I’ve managed formal succession-planning systems for a number of large companies and consulted with quite a few smaller companies. I network with others that do the same, and keep up with the latest succession-planning current practices, trends, and challenges.

I’m a bona fide succession-planning insider, and I know what goes on behind the scenes.

Here are 10 things your company probably isn’t telling you about succession planning:

1.[…] Continue Reading »

Companies have C-suites and they care about strategy. So it makes sense that many would have a chief strategy officer — someone devoted to such a key part of a company’s survival and success.

But chief strategy officers are not nearly talked about as much as chief operating officers or chief financial officers, much less CEOs. Here’s the Google Search trend for those three titles:

I mentioned this, and my general unfamiliarity with the position, when I talked with Patrick J.[…] Continue Reading »

A collection of stories from SmartBrief publications and around the web…

Regulating trust: Trust. It is a buzzword in the wealth management industry. Advisers and Wall Street leaders say the industry is founded on serving clients and maintaining their trust. But in light of Flash Boys, regulators are pondering whether or not they have to ensure brokers can actually be … you know … trusted to make the right choices for their clients.[…] Continue Reading »

In 2011, the oldest baby boomers reached the traditional retirement age of 65, and through 2029, about 8,000 boomers will reach that milestone every day. This aging of America will result in a significant shift in mature industries such as financial services because the average financial planner is currently 57.

As they reach their “golden years,” many of these professionals, who have worked hard to build successful practices, will choose to leave them — ideally in the capable hands of colleagues who’ve been trained to step into their shoes.[…] Continue Reading »