Archive for SEC SmartBlogs

Social media has become a necessity for financial advisers to stay “top of mind” with clients and prospects, but they need to be able to “put the time and dedication into it” in order to make their efforts successful, said Amy McIlwain, president of Financial Social Media.

LinkedIn is a popular choice for financial-services firms because its users are there for business purposes, making it the “trade show” of social media platforms, McIlwain said Saturday during NAIFA’s Career Conference and Annual Meeting in San Diego.[…] Continue Reading »

A collection of stories from SmartBrief publications and around the web…

Regulating trust: Trust. It is a buzzword in the wealth management industry. Advisers and Wall Street leaders say the industry is founded on serving clients and maintaining their trust. But in light of Flash Boys, regulators are pondering whether or not they have to ensure brokers can actually be … you know … trusted to make the right choices for their clients.[…] Continue Reading »

A collection of stories from SmartBrief publications and around the web…

“One last thing before I go…”: This retirement speech by James Kidney, a former trial lawyer at the Securities and Exchange Commission, made waves this week for the shots he takes at the sometimes sheepish leadership at the Commission and revolving door ambitions of some staffers. “The revolving door is a very serious problem.[…] Continue Reading »

A collection of stories from SmartBrief publications and around the web…

Hedge funds run by women outperform industry index: In recent years, female hedge fund managers have delivered significantly better turns for clients than hedge funds as a whole, according to a report by the consulting firm Rothstein Kass. During a period of 6.5 years ending in June 2013, an index measuring the performance of female alternative investment managers gained 6% while an index of the overall performance of hedge funds declined 1.1%.[…] Continue Reading »

A collection of stories from SmartBrief publications and around the web…

M.I.T. economist dissects financial innovation: Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Alp Simsek has published a new paper that challenges the view that financial innovation reduces risk. “Financial innovation might be good for other reasons, but this general kind of belief that it reduces the risks in the economy is not right,” Simsek explains.[…] Continue Reading »