Archive for productivity SmartBlogs

Happiness. What does it mean to be happy? And why should executives care? Businesses should care because workers who aren’t happy aren’t working hard. Gallup has found that 70% of American workers are not happy, and that this state of affairs translates into lost productivity of $500 billion. Suddenly, this whole happiness thing should be of great interest to corporate executives who want productive workers and a smoothly functioning culture.[…] Continue Reading »

“I know the people on the phone can’t see this, but …”

By the third time our meeting facilitator offered the same apology, I began to suspect we were doing something stupid, or at least ineffective. But most likely stupid.

I’d been through this before, of course, on both ends of a telecom. We all have. Dialing in remotely to a meeting where wall charts and whiteboards are used but not broadcast can be an exquisitely frustrating experience.[…] Continue Reading »

As a leader, it’s your job to ensure you’re always pushing your employees to form positive workplace habits. But like any ingrained routine, it takes more than motivation for it to truly sink in. Even the most promising change can fizz out if it’s not repeated on a daily basis.

According to international business speaker and author Michael Kerr, successful people tend to thrive on routine and consistent habits.[…] Continue Reading »

It seems every day brings more e-mails, more data, more information to sort through. Your workload increases but you can’t add more hours to the day. How can you push back?

Use these innovations to reduce overwork, streamline communication and increase productivity. Take advantage of technology. Make it work for you instead of driving your life.[…] Continue Reading »

Meetings at your company aren’t going away. If anything, that much-maligned beast is growing in prominence, thanks to the ease of gathering people via technology. This Harvard Business Review article found that on average, executives spend more than two days each week in meetings. Outside the executive offices, everyone else gets to join in the fun as well: 15% of an entire organization’s time is spent in meetings.[…] Continue Reading »