Archive for packaging SmartBlogs

This post is sponsored by Evergreen Packaging.

Linda Gilbert is founder and CEO EcoFocus Worldwide, LLC, and founder and former president of HealthFocus International. She brings more than 30 years as a market researcher and strategy consultant helping companies link their product benefits to consumer and nutrition trends.

She’s done extensive qualitative and quantitative studies for food and beverage manufacturers and other in the industry.[…] Continue Reading »

I recall a business meeting where my team hosted 20 colleagues from Japan. At the end of the meeting, each and every one of our guests twisted the cap back onto his soda bottle and placed it in his bag. I had noticed cultural differences via greetings and meeting behaviors throughout the day. This action, however, transcended customs and geographies and I realized in that moment that appreciation for beauty and art is a universal human trait.[…] Continue Reading »

Millennial consumers are having a noticeable effect on food and beverage brands, and their influence is increasingly being reflected in the products’ packaging. As the 21 million-strong generation wields its $1.3 trillion in direct spending power, brands have begun to take note of their product preferences and the trends that are driving their purchasing decisions.

This generation cares more about the benefits of the products, including the emotional benefits, so the goodness should be spelled out on the packaging.[…] Continue Reading »

Nowadays, having a brand with a long history isn’t enough to keep consumer loyalty and capture their spending dollars. From Oscar Mayer rebranding its Lunchables line to KC Masterpiece updating its packaging design, many companies, no matter how long they’ve been around, are making changes to stay current and remain fresh in the minds of consumers, and communicating messages of authenticity through packaging is key, experts agree.[…] Continue Reading »

Snacks used to be those after-school occasions when children savored milk and cookies, or an adult grabbed an apple to tide herself over until dinner. Now snacks are edging in on meal territory, representing half of all eating occasions.

The reasons for this shift are embedded in U.S. food culture. People’s time — and therefore their traditional meals — have become increasingly fragmented, leaving snacks to carry a greater proportion of the physical, emotional, social and cultural desires people have around food, according to The Hartman Group’s 2013 report, “Modern Eating: Cultural Roots, Daily Behaviors.” For example:

  • 73% of snacking is physically driven: That includes 44 percent hunger abatement, often between meals, plus 15 percent nutritional support to recover from physical exertion or meet specific nutrient needs and 12 percent pick-me-ups for a burst of energy to combat lethargy or mental fatigue.
  • […] Continue Reading »