Archive for outlook SmartBlogs

The construction sector was booming in the mid-to late-2000s, and then the Great Recession grabbed hold and the industry changed overnight. Layoffs were rampant; dozens of mega-construction projects stalled; half-built buildings dotted the country. But, after a few years, a slow, but increasingly steady — or at least somewhat optimistic — outlook started to take hold.

Housing starts were increasing rapidly, and passage of the transportation bill, or MAP-21, put roadwork back on the map.[…] Continue Reading »

Six years of recession in the U.S. has cut a $1.2 trillion-a-year construction industry into one that is worth about $800 billion a year. It also chopped more than 2 million jobs from the industry, according to data from the Associated General Contractors of America. However, a survey by AGC and co-sponsored by Computer Guidance leads AGC to look at 2013 as a potential turning point with tentative signs of recovery.[…] Continue Reading »

The biggest barrier to maximizing the potential of social technology — in sales, PR, marketing or even internal collaboration — is the persistent notion that it is mysterious, complex and utterly impractical.

Millions of people that your organization is trying to reach are still staying away from social networks because they don’t feel like they “get” what they’re for.[…] Continue Reading »

London loves its social media. The city is the biggest network on Facebook, the most active on Twitter and provides a whopping 10% of the traffic on Digg. Some locals say those numbers may be misleading, since they could incorporate residents of surrounding areas. Others claim the phenomenon has to do with the polite distance London denizens keep from one another in the real world.[…] Continue Reading »

London loves its social media. The city is the biggest network on Facebook, the most active on Twitter and provides a whopping 10% of the traffic on Digg. Some locals say those numbers may be misleading, since they could incorporate residents of surrounding areas. Others claim the phenomenon has to do with the polite distance London denizens keep from one another in the real world.[…] Continue Reading »