Archive for leadershipdevelopment SmartBlogs

#484429103 / gettyimages.com

 

It hardly seems possible, but the time has come when high-potential millennials are assuming leadership roles.

If you take the long view, it makes sense to prepare your best, young professionals now for the big promotional step that their predecessors typically had to wait 10, 15 years or longer to expect. They’re already so “up to speed” on so many essential, differentiating aspects of the competitive marketplace that they add value now that renders the typical career maturing process obsolete.[…] Continue Reading »

Think about the learning that contributed most powerfully to your development and who you are today. Consider the experiences that built the expertise you use and value most every day. Reflect on what you’re most proud of mastering during the course of your career or life.

This memorable learning that has made a significant difference to you (and to the organizations you’ve served) likely didn’t come easily.[…] Continue Reading »

Leadership books inevitably face a quandary — they need to tell a story but they also need to be believable as something that can be replicated, preferably without an excess of effort.

What often results, even among well-written, smart reads, are books that are short on data and long on anecdotes and checklists. What data there is often is situation-specific information that the author, by necessity, stretches to encompass a philosophy.[…] Continue Reading »

I am a huge fan of SmartBrief; great articles about leadership. I was very pleased that my article “Listening is our Most Important Skill” was posted on the site recently.

Almost right away, I received lots of e-mail responses to the article. So many readers said they totally agreed about the importance of listening, they wanted to improve, and they asked for more information.[…] Continue Reading »

A friend of mine, a key leader with a major insurance company, regularly comes around her desk when one of her team members comes to speak with her. She feels that sitting side by side rather than across a desk leads to a better discussion. Why? Because she is putting that person at ease, she is conveying that she genuinely cares about him, and she is listening intently to what he has to say.[…] Continue Reading »