Archive for JanePerdue SmartBlogs

CEO’s are normally quick to hop on ideas, products, services, etc., that can and do yield favorable economic results. Yet, despite encouraging statistics showing its beneficial bottom line impacts, there has been little movement in most organizations to include diversity and inclusion as a strategic business priority.

A Harvard Business Review analysis of top-performing CEOs found a mere 5% of CEO’s whose organizations excel at both year over year financial performance and social and environmental dimensions.[…] Continue Reading »

To some, being a leader is just a job. But to others, it’s a choice, a calling even, to inspire others to engage, perform, and achieve. The women and men who make this choice are skilled in a number of areas that bring out the best in everyone and everything. They’re leaders who get it.

Their secret sauce?[…] Continue Reading »

Forty-four years ago, economist Milton Friedman changed the way corporations did business with his declaration that “there is one and only one social responsibility of business — to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game.”

Power-suited corporate executives turned their attention to increasing stock prices, upping dividend payments and boosting earnings, all as part of maximizing shareholder value.[…] Continue Reading »

A Department of Labor report on the glass ceiling noted that “what’s important [in organizations] is comfort, chemistry, and collaboration.”

Chris Argyris, business theorist and professor, says there’s a universal human tendency to organize our lives around remaining in control and winning.

Might these hidden needs be the reason most companies have failed at incorporating diversity as a normal business practice despite all the research that demonstrates its positive impacts on the bottom line?[…] Continue Reading »

Cheryl, you know more about these work processes than most of the folks up there. Did you apply to be a speaker?” I asked, wondering why my colleague was sitting next to me in the audience rather than participating in the panel discussion at the national conference we were attending.

“I thought about it but decided not to.”

“Why’s that?”

“Once I get promoted, my chances of being a speaker will be better.”

Six months later, Cheryl called to tell me she’d been laid off during a company reorganization.[…] Continue Reading »