Archive for intentions SmartBlogs

When you hear why “The Power of Fifty Bits” is titled such as it is, you may think, “That sounds pessimistic.” After all, the brain take in 10 million bits of information each second, but only 50 bits of that is processed as conscious thought. Feels like our brains are pretty inefficient.

And, then, if you learn that author Bob Nease’s background was in pharma, and as chief scientist of Express Scripts his challenges included getting patients to be better about taking their medication, you might think, “Ah, this is about getting people to stop being jerks and take their medicine!”

Fortunately, as his book and a recent conversation we had illustrate, Bob Nease is an optimist about our ability to make better choices — a revelation that initially surprised him, too.[…] Continue Reading »

Many leaders put as much effort into defining how they want to “show up” as they would in buying a new refrigerator. In fact, some may give their leadership skills even less thought. These mindless leaders react to whatever captures their attention and desire in the moment, but don’t stop to think about their impact or how they want others to remember them when they are no longer around.[…] Continue Reading »

Jan. 1 is coming fast! If you’re like most of us, you’re knee-deep in year-end closing reports, next year budgets, family holiday planning — and stress!

Life is at the end of the year is just crazy — largely because we’re scrambling to meet so many goals we set for ourselves (and those set by others). Even though it feels nutty, this is actually a good time of the year to take a deep breath and think strategically about how we set our goals — for meetings, days, weeks and years — to help us reduce stress and increase productivity.[…] Continue Reading »

If you haven’t started thinking about your goals for 2013, you better get cracking! In this three-part video series and December webinar, we’re evaluating what makes a good goal statement — the kind that is more likely to be achieved.

Simple goal statements — “In 2013 we will increase revenues 10%” — are fine on PowerPoints and year-end reviews, but they lack information necessary to help those responsible for achieving them.[…] Continue Reading »

2013 is right around the corner, so it’s time to start evaluating our success for 2012 and setting goals for next year — professionally and personally. In this three-part video series and December webinar on the subject, we’ll look at ways to format and set goals that will make them more achievable.

Traditional business goal-setting uses simple, measurable statements — “In 2013, we will increase revenues 10%.” There’s nothing wrong with a goal like this, and it makes it easy for the organization to determine progress, but it lacks the information necessary to support the people who have to achieve it.[…] Continue Reading »