Archive for inspiringothers SmartBlogs

“Are you a tough boss?” asked an interviewer of John L. Weinberg, senior partner and de facto CEO of Goldman Sachs. A former Marine, Weinberg was a blunt-speaking, unabashed, and self-driven man who knew that most of Goldman’s employees sought to work as hard and as wisely as he himself did. During the period of his leadership, Goldman furthered and consolidated its rapid ascent as a global banking powerhouse.[…] Continue Reading »

Change is a deeply human phenomenon, activating deeply human responses that don’t always help to advance organizational goals relative to change. But given today’s business environment — in which it seems that constant and escalating change is the fuel behind much progress and results — leaders must quickly master their ability to understand and constructively respond to the range of responses that could inhibit success.[…] Continue Reading »

During my years as a consultant, I have often had people say to me, “I wish my leader knew …” to which I would encourage the individual to speak up and raise an issue of real concern so things might improve. When I did this, I often got the following responses:

“It won’t make a difference.”

“I don’t want to get in trouble.”

“It will just make them mad.”

Whatever the excuse for not speaking up, I noticed that most people were afraid of the consequences.[…] Continue Reading »

Creativity breeds fresh ideas, but the stigma that creativity is an indefinable and unattainable quality steers us toward old processes that yield predictable answers.

Brian Stone is a principal partner in the international consultancy Latitude 40 Design, as well as an associate professor in the design department of Ohio State University. He found that many of his students believe real creativity is elusive, saying things that allude to the idea of a magic bullet or some kind of potion you can take to make yourself creative.[…] Continue Reading »

I was recently listening to a spiritual talk when one of the speakers said something that struck me: We must always try to do the right thing, and when we do, not only does it help others, it also helps us to feel good about ourselves and what we do.

John Fontana, a management consultant and the director of the Arupe Center of Ethics in Business, believes that grace and spirituality in the workplace can be transformative to an organization’s culture and spirit.[…] Continue Reading »