Archive for goalsetting SmartBlogs

For many organizations, as the new year begins, performance-management processes kick in.

When people think about performance management, they’re rarely enthused! The response to performance planning is typically neutral, at best.

My experience with clients is that their current performance-management systems are not as relevant to real work and real opportunities as they could be. Performance management today is typically not about developing new skills and greater contribution.[…] Continue Reading »

Perhaps you aspire to the corner office, or you want to develop leadership skills that will help advance your career. You can begin to learn what it takes to be CEO by becoming CEO of your own career.

As CEO, here are six responsibilities you must oversee as you lead the enterprise (the business of advancing your career).[…] Continue Reading »

Leading change starts with a compelling leadership vision for change. According to leadership expert John Kotter, a lack of leadership vision is one of the most common reasons why transformational change efforts fail.

A leadership vision isn’t just for large, CEO-led, companywide transformational changes. Leaders at all levels need to inspire people to change in order to overcome significant challenges and achieve important goals.[…] Continue Reading »

Jan. 1 is coming fast! If you’re like most of us, you’re knee-deep in year-end closing reports, next year budgets, family holiday planning — and stress!

Life is at the end of the year is just crazy — largely because we’re scrambling to meet so many goals we set for ourselves (and those set by others). Even though it feels nutty, this is actually a good time of the year to take a deep breath and think strategically about how we set our goals — for meetings, days, weeks and years — to help us reduce stress and increase productivity.[…] Continue Reading »

If you haven’t started thinking about your goals for 2013, you better get cracking! In this three-part video series and December webinar, we’re evaluating what makes a good goal statement — the kind that is more likely to be achieved.

Simple goal statements — “In 2013 we will increase revenues 10%” — are fine on PowerPoints and year-end reviews, but they lack information necessary to help those responsible for achieving them.[…] Continue Reading »