Archive for EnergyInnovationSummit SmartBlogs

In order to radically innovate, your company has to be small and nimble, said Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors and CEO and chief technical officer of SpaceX.

“It’s generally true that the larger a company is, the harder it is to execute their vision,” Musk said at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit in Maryland. However, there are exceptions, such as Apple, which had a strong leader in Steve Jobs, who was relentless in his vision for the company.[…] Continue Reading »

The leadership of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee might differ on what America’s energy future should look like, but they agree that innovation led by the Department of Energy’s ARPA-E program will play an important part.

Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and ranking member Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, praised the program for fostering ingenuity and the next big thing in energy.[…] Continue Reading »

In what may have been his final appearance in office, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that knowing now how it would be, he would have still gladly taken the office in 2009. Chu told the audience at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit in Maryland that he learned that it was most important to focus on hiring the right people to accomplish the Obama administration’s clean and sustainable energy initiatives, rather than just the initiatives themselves.[…] Continue Reading »

American innovation brought about the natural gas production boom the U.S. is now experiencing, and Americans would be fools not to capitalize on it, energy tycoon T. Boone Pickens said at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit in Maryland.

The U.S. has the advantages of the Marcellus Shale Formation — which mostly sits under New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio and is the world’s biggest natural gas field — and the technology to successfully extract gas from it, Pickens said.[…] Continue Reading »

The ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit annually showcases the importance of emerging technologies and sustaining them until they can get venture capital. But this year’s event last week was also a de facto referendum on the problems facing U.S. manufacturing.

It wasn’t just the obvious sessions – “Barriers to Domestic Manufacturing” and “Obstacles to a Manufacturing Workforce” – but also speakers repeatedly emphasizing similar sentiments and attendees sharing their stories in panel sessions or on Twitter.[…] Continue Reading »