Archive for employeeengagement SmartBlogs

What separates the best leaders from the rest when it comes to employee engagement?

Our research shows the best leaders communicate an inspiring vision and live it, value people and give them a voice. Here are seven of the 100+ best practices that leaders can use to engage people.

1. Set “top five” high-level annual priorities. Many leaders today are overwhelming the people they lead by trying to do too much.[…] Continue Reading »

Do your employees secretly hate the communication techniques you’re currently using?

According to a study by Root, Inc., more than half of employees surveyed have felt frustrated and unhappy about work. Whether that unhappiness results in absenteeism, low productivity, dissatisfaction or disengagement, poor organizational communication is likely a root cause.

Trying to pick up on the subtle signs that your communication processes aren’t working for your employees can be difficult.[…] Continue Reading »

#89081916 / gettyimages.com

When I e-mailed my great idea to the CEO, I was pleasantly surprised by the fast response. He loved it and wanted me to discuss it further with one of his deputies.

While he might have preferred that I submit the idea using our corporate crowdsourcing platform, he was pleased with my initiative and my interest in improving our firm.[…] Continue Reading »

This post is part of the series “Workplace Morale,” a weeklong effort co-hosted by SmartBrief’s SmartBlog on Leadership and the folks at Switch & ShiftKeep track of the series here and check out our daily e-mail newsletter, SmartBrief on Leadership. Don’t subscribe? Sign up.

Any founder will tell you they want to build a company they can be proud of.[…] Continue Reading »

I recently read another post about why people hate their jobs and what employers can do about it. The post, published in USA Today and titled “The Motley Fool: Why you hate your job” is just another mainstream media attention grab. It really contains very little from a fresh or new perspective.

To their credit, they do cite the well-referenced Gallup survey that 52% of workers are not engaged in their work and that another 18% describe themselves as “actively disengaged.” The author goes on to drive home the point that American productivity is victim of this epidemic.[…] Continue Reading »