Archive for employeedevelopment SmartBlogs

What you teach employees during mentoring, coaching or skills training will be out of mind as soon as you’re out of sight unless you reinforce the learning. For that you can thank the “forgetting curve.” This psychological principle, first identified in the 19th century, posits that much of what we learn is quickly forgotten, most of it within hours.[…] Continue Reading »

You’ve probably never heard of Byron Lionel Kohlbusch from Hermann, Mo. He wrote plenty of “poison pen” corporate memos but never any famous business books. Byron was a gifted manager, who groomed great salespeople in unconventional ways. This Thanksgiving, as I reflected on my career, I was grateful for the lessons he taught me.

Here’s how he navigated spittoons, distracted driving, newbie employees, and other workplace dynamics.[…] Continue Reading »

It goes without saying that younger, less experienced employees have different development needs compared to more seasoned employees. But that is amplified in the era of helicopter parenting. Because helicopter parents tend to hover over their children, protecting them from harm, structuring educational opportunities, and making decisions on their behalf, today’s younger employees tend to have less developed life skills.[…] Continue Reading »

When I was young and new to a corporate position, my manager, Karen, gave me an assignment that involved translating a confusing government regulation into a benefit that would be available for our employees. She was expecting a proposal from me that would detail what needed to be done and then to lead the implementation of the benefit.[…] Continue Reading »

Is there ever a time when a senior leader can hedge a bit on a core company value? What if he or she is making a genuine effort to live that value, but consistently falls short? And, what if that employee is a key player with deep expertise in a much-needed area? When is the right time to say, “This just isn’t working out”?[…] Continue Reading »