Archive for edtech SmartBlogs

Thinking about social media and how it works in regards to learning inside and outside of classrooms is endless and inspiring. Just by tweeting an idea, you can spark a connection and invite your students to experience the value of social media.

As I began to dabble with this idea, I was immediately struck by how other educators were using this tool as a way to connect, engage and enhance learning.[…] Continue Reading »

Busy K-12 education technology innovators looking to boost their know-how and expand their skill set now have a timely new resource. SmartBrief is pleased to announce “Tech Tips Tuesdays” in SmartBrief on EdTech, the leading daily K-12 Ed Tech newsletter. The tips, written by educators for educators, are being produced in partnership with GreyED Solutions, a company headed by nationally recognized education leaders serving K-12 schools and the EdTech Industry.[…] Continue Reading »

We teachers are very tempted to employ the “back in my day, we did things differently” tactic with our students. Student zoning out in class? Tough, because back in my day you either paid attention or you missed out. Didn’t know what the homework was? Too bad, because back in my day you picked up the phone and called someone to find out.[…] Continue Reading »

Blended learning is transforming roles of teachers and students in many classrooms and has become a trendy buzzword in education in recent years. Yet, for all its trendiness and efficacy, the true meaning of what blended learning means has somehow gotten lost in all the buzz. This has become a term that has many meanings to many different stakeholders.[…] Continue Reading »

I tend to be one of those educational risk takers.

As a K-12 administrator, I loved nothing more than to visit classrooms where there was a buzz of student learning, where you could stand in the doorway for minutes before anyone even knew you were there, where a room was a hive of student activity, where the teacher was lost in the swirl of investigation and collaboration, where classroom management stemmed from an intensity of engagement rather than the enforcement of rules.[…] Continue Reading »