Archive for construction SmartBlogs

Three economists offer their outlook on construction activity and construction spending for the rest of this year, and beyond.

Bernard Markstein, chief economist at Reed Construction Data, Ken Simonson, chief economist at the Associated General Contractors of America and Kermit Baker, chief economist at the American Institute of Architects were the featured speakers at the April 17 webinar “2014: Emerging Opportunities for Construction.” They each mapped out what they’ve seen this year and where they think the AEC industry is headed.[…] Continue Reading »

The construction sector was booming in the mid-to late-2000s, and then the Great Recession grabbed hold and the industry changed overnight. Layoffs were rampant; dozens of mega-construction projects stalled; half-built buildings dotted the country. But, after a few years, a slow, but increasingly steady — or at least somewhat optimistic — outlook started to take hold.

Housing starts were increasing rapidly, and passage of the transportation bill, or MAP-21, put roadwork back on the map.[…] Continue Reading »

Six years of recession in the U.S. has cut a $1.2 trillion-a-year construction industry into one that is worth about $800 billion a year. It also chopped more than 2 million jobs from the industry, according to data from the Associated General Contractors of America. However, a survey by AGC and co-sponsored by Computer Guidance leads AGC to look at 2013 as a potential turning point with tentative signs of recovery.[…] Continue Reading »

Brad M. Hutensky is the principal of Hutensky Capital Partners, a fund manager that invests in U.S. retail real estate and the 2012-13 chairman of the International Council of Shopping Centers.

As we look forward to a new year, what challenges do you see the shopping center industry facing, and how best do these need to be addressed?[…] Continue Reading »

The architecture, engineering and construction industry is in better shape than it was a year ago, and the upward trend could continue, three economists said during a webcast by Reed Construction Data. However, the “fiscal cliff,” troubled state economies, tight lending standards and the Obama administration’s regulatory agenda are headwinds that could alter the trend, they said.[…] Continue Reading »