Archive for communication SmartBlogs

“I know the people on the phone can’t see this, but …”

By the third time our meeting facilitator offered the same apology, I began to suspect we were doing something stupid, or at least ineffective. But most likely stupid.

I’d been through this before, of course, on both ends of a telecom. We all have. Dialing in remotely to a meeting where wall charts and whiteboards are used but not broadcast can be an exquisitely frustrating experience.[…] Continue Reading »

When leaders blow up, lose their tempers or let their emotions get the better of them, they can quickly develop a reputation as volatile, moody, defensive or having a lack of leadership presence.

Unfortunately, all it takes is one public outburst. When coaching leaders who have received negative 360-degree feedback about composure, I’ll ask them when the last time they lost their cool was.[…] Continue Reading »

The show “Shark Tank,” like much of the media, perpetuates the myth that you have to be aggressive, assertive, even confrontational to advance your career and become a leader; that thoughtfulness, politeness, and the inability to summarize an important idea in less than a minute are crippling diseases; and that the business world is akin to a shark tank where you are likely to be devoured unless you adopt the characteristics of the sharks to survive.[…] Continue Reading »

Why do some people get ahead and others do not?

That’s the thought-provoking question addressed by authors Kim Zoller and Kerry Preston in the book “Enhancing Your Executive Edge.”

According to the authors, what distinguishes those who succeed in moving up the ladder is their “executive edge,” a presence that projects leadership, confidence, and credibility. I couldn’t agree more![…] Continue Reading »

Conciliators make the world go around. Or at least function more smoothly.

Conciliators have the ability to get people to get along with one another not merely as compromisers but as collaborators. Conciliation also works when things are broken. Then they become those who can reconcile aggrieved parties.

“The main object of conciliation,” said Confucius, “lies in reaching a solution to a case based upon morals and with a warm heart.” Morality underscores the principle to getting people to work together for the right reasons.[…] Continue Reading »