Archive for careerdevelopment SmartBlogs

I had the recent opportunity to lead a conversation about emotional intelligence, (or emotional quotient — EQ), during a webcast for ATD, the global Association for Talent Development. ATD is a premiere organization that offers extensive training and learning opportunities to its membership of approximately 40,000 executives, managers and associates, and their companies.

The webcast generated great interest with a high number of members participating.[…] Continue Reading »

I’m not a gamer, but when I hear the phrase “call of duty,” the popular video game immediately comes to mind.

In fact, I’ve heard it so much that when I hear the phrase outside of the gaming context, I sit up and take notice. Just what does call of duty mean in the real world? It sounds like a summoning, urging me to take a stand.[…] Continue Reading »

Adapted from Organizational Behavior, Schermerhorn, Hunt, & Osborn, John Wiley & Sons, 2000, pgs. 311-15

Power or Influence? This is an important question as we navigate through our careers. The two are often confused for one another so our first step is to define them. Here are my definitions:

  • Power: The ability to get others to do something you want done, and perhaps even to complete the task the way you want it done.
  • […] Continue Reading »

Think about the learning that contributed most powerfully to your development and who you are today. Consider the experiences that built the expertise you use and value most every day. Reflect on what you’re most proud of mastering during the course of your career or life.

This memorable learning that has made a significant difference to you (and to the organizations you’ve served) likely didn’t come easily.[…] Continue Reading »

Leadership books inevitably face a quandary — they need to tell a story but they also need to be believable as something that can be replicated, preferably without an excess of effort.

What often results, even among well-written, smart reads, are books that are short on data and long on anecdotes and checklists. What data there is often is situation-specific information that the author, by necessity, stretches to encompass a philosophy.[…] Continue Reading »