Archive for AGC SmartBlogs

The Associated Contractors of America released their 2016 Construction Hiring and Business Outlook Report today, and the results were fairly optimistic although the majority of respondents expect about the same dollar volume of projects they compete for this year to be in line with last year. That said, 63% of the more than 1,500 firms from around the country who participated in the survey indicate they’ll increase their workforce by up to 25%, while only 6% see layoffs on the horizon.[…] Continue Reading »

Three construction-focused economists discussed the state of the US construction economy in a panel presentation/webinar presented by CMD iSqFt at Greenbuild on Thursday.

Where the construction economy is now compared with where it was

“The US economy is where it’s at,” Alex Carrick told me in an interview prior to the panel discussion.[…] Continue Reading »

The turning point in the building industry dawned in May 2014, when the “total employment level reached its prerecession level” and companies stopped looking in the rear-view mirror trying to outrun the Great Recession and started to think again of the future. So said Alex Carrick, North American chief economist at CMD during last week’s webinar on the state of the industry.[…] Continue Reading »

More than 3 in 4 contracting firms are finding it difficult to fill skilled trade positions, and more than 3 in 5 are finding project supers, estimators and engineers hard to find, according to a survey by the Associated General Contractors of America conducted in August and September. The Southeast sees the largest challenge, where 86% of contractors face labor challenges; the Northeast is better off, but far from complacent as 67% of contractors there try to deal with the problem.[…] Continue Reading »

The construction sector was booming in the mid-to late-2000s, and then the Great Recession grabbed hold and the industry changed overnight. Layoffs were rampant; dozens of mega-construction projects stalled; half-built buildings dotted the country. But, after a few years, a slow, but increasingly steady — or at least somewhat optimistic — outlook started to take hold.

Housing starts were increasing rapidly, and passage of the transportation bill, or MAP-21, put roadwork back on the map.[…] Continue Reading »