Advertising Week covers a range of topics, but potty training may still seem like an unlikely one.

Still, toddlers and diapers were all the buzz as day two of the Mobile Marketing Association’s SM2 conference kicked off on Wednesday.

Melanie Huet of Kimberly-Clark and Dwayne Raupp of Organic discussed the implementation of and lessons learned from the Pull-Ups Time to Potty app, a mobile application that gives parents a way to reward children as they transition out of diapers.

Listening to user feedback was key to the app’s success, Raupp said. Initially, it required parents to scan a Pull-Up diaper to unlock the reward, but users complained that the additional step led to a cumbersome process. Eliminating that requirement led to a simpler app that more consumers used.

Such insights by brands that are embracing and experimenting with mobile featured big at the conference. The first day included sessions on the Internet of Things, real-time mobile marketing and case studies by companies such as Toyota Motors and Dunkin’ Brands on how they are using mobile to improve the customer experience. (read more…)

The CEOs of three major advertising industry associations shared a stage on the second day of the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s MIXX Conference, using the occasion to announce a new accountability organization to tackle ad fraud, piracy and malware.

The jointly managed group will have its own board and leadership, and it will be tasked with establishing industry principles and holding companies accountable to them. The goal, according to the IAB’s Randall Rothenberg, is to “weed out ad fraud from the digital supply chain.”

Bob Liodice of the Association of National Advertisers, Nancy Hill of the American Association of Advertising Agencies and Rothenberg also discussed what has been an eight-year partnership among the organizations spanning initiatives. Despite having different agendas and not always seeing eye-to-eye, each emphasized that collaboration is necessary in order to achieve progress on issues ranging from policy to industry standards.

“We woke up and realized we can’t do it alone. (read more…)

Have you ever sat through a keynote address or read a book from a thought leader in your industry and wondered how they achieved their status? If so, you aren’t alone. In fact, we found ourselves asking this question so frequently that we decided to conduct extensive research on the topic. We wondered: What makes these experts so appealing to buyers? How did they rise to their level of fame? What types of benefits are they bringing to their firm?

To answer these questions, we interviewed 130 prominent industry thought leaders — Visible Experts, as we call them. We also surveyed over 1,000 buyers of expert services to get a perspective from the other side of the equation. Our findings proved that these industry stars are even more beneficial to their firms than we originally anticipated.

Over 60% of experts interviewed revealed two key benefits: Brand building, and growth and business development. (read more…)

“Video is exploding.”

That statement by Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg during her opening remarks at the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s MIXX Conference sums up the sentiment among publishers and marketers as this year’s Advertising Week begins.

Sandberg made her remarks to Katie Couric as the duo shared the stage at the IAB conference. Couric explained that her Yahoo News interviews with baseball legend Joe Torre and Secretary of State John Kerry are available in both snippets and in longer form to take advantage of the multiple ways that consumers now consume content.

“We try to give people options,” Couric explained. “I’m hoping digital content doesn’t make people want things in 30 seconds or less. As we get more involved and more acclimated to this way of consuming information, there will be a desire for longer pieces.”

That demand is being driven in large part by the ready access to mobile devices and high-speed Internet consumers now have. (read more…)

Since the announcement of its IPO in November 2013, Twitter has been highly scrutinized for its lack of user growth, but in the past few months, the platform has been shaking things up.

As a result of its newly introduced targeting capabilities, the possibility of an algorithmic timeline, a heightened focus on direct response, and what seems like a new wave of second-screen experiences, marketers have all eyes on Twitter.

1. Targeting

This August, the platform unveiled a new objective-based sales model, which allows marketers to optimize and pay for campaigns based on actions that align with their marketing objectives, making the platform more efficient than ever before. Objectives include: followers (community growth, fan acquisition), clicks and conversions, engagements, app installs and app engagements, and lead generation. This sales model comes shortly after Twitter released new CTA ad units, such as Download App and its Buy button. Although currently only available to the platform’s SMB and API partners, the new sales model is expected to roll out to clients over the next few months. (read more…)