Feedback, as Marshall Goldsmith taught me, is a gift. And as such we need to thank people when they deliver it to us.

It is not enough to say thank you. You also need to learn to accept it — and act up on it.

When the feedback is coming from a trusted source — even if we don’t like that individual — it should be considered, and changes made.

John Baldoni is chair of leadership development at N2Growth, is an internationally recognized leadership educator and executive coach. In 2014, Trust Across America named him to its list of top 100 most trustworthy business experts. Also in 2014, Inc.com named Baldoni to its list of top 100 leadership experts, and Global Gurus ranked him No. 11 on its list of global leadership experts. Baldoni is the author of more than a dozen books, including his newest, “MOXIE: The Secret to Bold and Gutsy Leadership.”

If you enjoyed this article, join SmartBrief’s e-mail list for our daily newsletter on being a better, smarter leader. (read more…)

No one wants to work for a micromanager. Micromanagers are control freaks, always breathing down their employee’s, telling them how to do everything and inspecting every move they make.

Working for a micromanaging boss is one of the most frequently reported reasons employees hate their jobs or hate their bosses.

Employees that work for micromanagers probably wish their bosses would just disappear. They dream about what it would be like to go totally boss-less, going about their work in a state of empowered nirvana.

Well, be careful what you wish for! The grass always looks greener on the other side of the fence.

While a micromanager anchors the extreme end of the management style continuum (high control), sitting at the far other end of the continuum is the macromanager (laissez-faire).

Working for a macromanager has its own set of challenges. A micromanager is always there when you don’t need them to be there; a macromanager is never around when you do have a question, need support, or need to get a decision made. (read more…)

meetings matter coverThis post is an excerpt from “MEETINGS MATTER: 8 Powerful Strategies for Remarkable Conversations,” (Jackson Creek Press, January 2015) by Paul Axtell.

There is a difference in life between acting out of obligation or out of inspiration. Inspiration is shaped by having some possibility in mind — seeing the connection between how you are spending your time and a desirable future that doesn’t exist right now.

There is a story about golf pro Byron Nelson, who experienced a lull in his career after being the very best in the game. Then his enthusiasm returned, and once again he was on the circuit playing tournaments.

When asked about his comeback, Nelson replied that he’d always had a dream to build a wonderful ranch. And one evening, he realized that golf was his path to that possibility — each tournament he won allowed him to buy more cattle or build more fencing. (read more…)

The Young Entrepreneur Council is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. Read previous SmartBlogs posts by YEC.

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What is the most valuable insight you’ve ever gotten from an employee about how YOU could perform better?

YEC_Tracy Wiedmeyer1. Work less

I was told to work less because it was a bit intimidating to get emails at all hours of the night — not to mention that it generally meant I wasn’t paying attention to a lot of things that really matter, such as employee satisfaction and balance in their lives. I’ve learned to bring a bit more balance to my life and hold off on sending those emails until the morning. (read more…)

When Millennials Take OverThis post is an edited excerpt from “When Millennials Take Over: Preparing for the Ridiculously Optimistic Future of Business,” (Ideapress Publishing, March 2015) by Jamie Notter and Maddie Grant. The book identifies four principles that will guide successful businesses now and in the future: Digital, Clear, Fluid, and Fast. This excerpt is from the chapter on Fast.

You hear it almost daily in the business press: The pace of change has gone through the roof, and our organizations are not keeping up. A strategic window opens up, but the organization can’t pivot fast enough and loses out to that creative new startup. The development of new technology being used both by our competitors and by our customers makes it almost impossible to stay ahead of the curve, and we find ourselves scrambling to keep up. Executives stay up at night worrying about speed, or the lack thereof.

Speed, of course, is a key variable in any calculation of productivity and efficiency. (read more…)