#108359383 / gettyimages.com

In our leadership development training, we like to start out by asking people to list as many characteristics about their former leaders that they abhorred or adored. This tends to start out as a fun exercise, but takes a more serious turn as people then start to look at themselves and their own leadership skills and behaviors.

10 leadership traits that people adore

  1. Has a clear vision of how people’s work meets the leader’s expectations.
  2. Provides timely, clear, constructive feedback.
  3. Expresses appreciation and gives credit where credit is due.
  4. Actively listens and answers questions.
  5. Treats others with respect and kindness.
  6. Consistently fair in their treatment of others.
  7. Trains, develops, and grows their people.
  8. Willing to jump in and help out when things become difficult.
  9. Has an open door policy and is available.
  10. Supportive and protective of their people when things go wrong.

Obviously, this list is not comprehensive. (read more…)

Do you know the one thing in common in companies like Skype, eBay and Facebook?

True, they are all successful in their own industries. But how did they get there?

One reason is that each used simple management technique called the 3Ps — the technique of progress, plans and problems. Now, it might sound silly to summarize the success of such remarkable enterprises to a single management method, but there is no reason to undervalue the true power in it. After all, companies are built up by people belonging to various teams. If the human resources are not managed properly, how could companies build extraordinary products or services?

Therefore, it is fair to say that unless you are a one-person business, it is crucial to find proper ways to collaborate and communicate with the people in your company. Or how else have you imagined becoming the next big phenomenon in your niche? (read more…)

I had the recent opportunity to lead a conversation about emotional intelligence, (or emotional quotient — EQ), during a webcast for ATD, the global Association for Talent Development. ATD is a premiere organization that offers extensive training and learning opportunities to its membership of approximately 40,000 executives, managers and associates, and their companies.

The webcast generated great interest with a high number of members participating. Following the webcast, ATD staff and I personally received a great deal of appreciative feedback — people agreed that EQ is essential in the workplace and that EQ is absolutely key to developing high-quality, productive relationships.

There is definitely a thirst for more knowledge about EQ, including how may we get our boss and senior management to recognize that such a focus would improve management and leadership effectiveness.

This led me to write this article, and I very much hope that I do this well. The subject of emotional intelligence is vitally important and essential to our success in business, in our leadership, and also in our happiness outside of our workplace. (read more…)

A new employee’s first day(s) at the office can 1) confirm their feeling that they’ve made the right choice coming to work for you, or 2) make them wonder if they’ve made a terrible mistake.

Needless to say, your chance of keeping the new person beyond the first few months goes up when their earliest days with the organization correspond to experience No. 1. So do the odds that the new hire will become fully engaged with your mission.

So what exactly goes into a good first day or three?

New hires need two big things from the onboarding process:

  • To feel as comfortable as possible, as soon as possible, and
  • To make progress in decoding the complex mix of values, procedures, customs, habits and jargon that makes up an organization’s culture.

The right space

Part of the “feeling comfortable” piece, of course, is a new hire’s impression that the employer has prepared an attractive, well-equipped work space for him or her. (read more…)

All organizations have social impact — good or bad, intended or not.

Social impact is the logical consequence of an organization’s plans, decisions, and actions on the social and economic lives of employees, customers, and their communities.

Such consequences might be direct or indirect, immediate or long term. Most organizations are unaware of their social impact and, therefore, invest little time or energy in appraising it.

To understand social impact, let’s look at an organization’s first and primary customers: their employees.

If an employee’s hourly wage goes up a nickel or five pence, there are benefits to the employee, the employee’s family, and the employee’s neighborhood. That wage boost might enable that employee to take his or her family out to dinner one night a month. That outing boosts family member’s satisfaction, possibly boosts their nutrition, and brings business to a local restaurant.

If an employee’s hourly wage goes up a dollar or a euro, the benefits to the employee, family, and neighborhood are typically greater – and more longer lasting. (read more…)