SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: Do leaders in your organization “hoard” talent?

  • Constantly — they never let go of their good people: 18.92%
  • Sometimes — they let good people move to new roles when forced to: 46.72%
  • Rarely — good talent can flow pretty easily: 30.12%
  • Never — our leaders are great at rotating talent: 4.25%

Be a Net Exporter of Talent. While it’s hard to lose a high performer, holding onto them and hoarding them is bad for everyone involved – them, the organization, and you. For them, it stunts their career growth. Eventually they’ll seek greener pastures (which is bad for the organization when they depart for another company). That’s bad for you ultimately because you lose a key player and people won’t want to join your team out of fear they’ll eventually stagnate. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How often are you an enabler of your team’s poor performance?

  • Never — I hold everyone accountable for their work: 14.89%
  • Sometimes — I occasionally let them get away with things: 75.84%
  • Often — I clean up their messes and they keep making them: 7.58%
  • Always — I struggle to hold them accountable for their work: 1.69%

Give them an inch… You’re the guardian of the standard. When you let your team members slide by and fix their shoddy work (or even worse – do it for them because it’s “easier for me to do it”) you’re an enabler of that bad behavior. Sure, it’s hard short-term to teach them and get them to fix their work but long term we all know it’s worth the effort. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How analytical is your organization?

  • Highly — we analyze everything sometimes at the cost of action: 42.71%
  • Very — we balance analysis with judgment: 27.62%
  • Somewhat — we do some analysis but act quickly: 19.44%
  • Not at all — little analysis, mostly action: 10.23%

Analysis Paralysis. Doing more analysis is often a stalling tactic to avoid making a decision. There’s a limit on how much data you can gather to predict the future. Your ability to make decisions based on good data is also a function of how strong your organization’s analytics program is. If you’ve created a solid analytics team, the likelihood of making faster decisions with better data goes up significantly. So try to build a solid analytics program and once you’ve gathered sufficient data, make your decision and move on with life. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: Which type of person is harder to lead?

  • Slacker — they have talent but won’t apply themselves: 24.31%
  • Steamroller — they apply themselves but harm relationships: 48.91%
  • Stowaway — they avoid work and hope to go unnoticed: 26.78%

Steamrollers need to be restrained. These folks are clearly tough to lead. A Steamroller gets momentum and gets things done which makes them especially challenging to deal with. The hard part is their accurate belief that they’re getting results so they don’t need to change their behaviors. The trick with leading them is helping them understand their rating is based upon results and relationships. As far as Slackers go, it’s about unlocking their motivation. For Stowaways, the key to improving their performance is holding them accountable and you investing more effort in changing their behaviors. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How well do you recognize when something will “trigger” you in a negative way?

  • Extremely well — I know my triggers and mitigate them before they happen: 11.37%
  • Very well — I recognize when I’m being triggered and act accordingly: 47.56%
  • Well — I can recover quickly when I’m triggered: 25.99%
  • Not well — I have trouble reacting well when I’m triggered: 14.15%
  • Poorly — I’m not aware I’ve been triggered until after the damage is done: .93%

Mindfulness matters. Everyone gets triggered. The leader’s challenge is to react to triggers appropriately. Losing your composure only takes a second but lasts much longer in terms of the negative perception you’ll create. Spend time thinking about things that trigger you (phrases, people, events, situations). (read more…)