SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How effectively does your organization choose the best decision-making style for a given decision?

  • Very effectively — we’re deliberate about choosing the right style: 5.78%
  • Effectively — we choose the right style most of the time: 32.13%
  • Not very effectively — we gravitate toward one style irrespective of the decision being made: 43.32%
  • What’s a decision-making style?: 18.77%

Different decisions require different styles. Organizations tend to gravitate toward a single decision making style. Whether it’s autocratic, consensus-based, participatory, or democratic, organizations find a style that’s comfortable as a default. The problem is that many times it’s exactly the wrong style for a given decision. The better you understand the 4 decision making styles, the more effectively you can apply them to make better and faster decisions. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: Are you comfortable promoting members of your team to manage former peers?

  • Yes — I’m fine with making those kinds of moves: 71.66%
  • Kind of — I know it can create awkward situations: 25.4%
  • No — it creates challenging dynamics: 2.94%

Support their leap. Making the leap from peer to boss is one of the more challenging advancement moves people face in their career. The awkwardness of being your friends’ boss, challenges to legitimacy, and previously “confidential” perspectives now being known by the new boss will stretch the new leader’s capabilities. Your job as their boss is to help them objectively assess their team members and create a plan to lead them effectively. Be sure you invest the time to help your newly-promoted team member succeed. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: What’s the biggest challenge you face when leading a “rising star”?

  • Keeping them challenged and engaged: 66.89%
  • Preventing them from leaving my team: 13.96%
  • Getting others to not be critical of them: 10.14%
  • No challenge at all! They’re great!: 9.01%

Keep Them Interested. Rising stars are fabulous team members but if you’re not careful, you’ll run out of things for them to be interested in. At that point you risk either losing them or having their motivation wane. Sometimes you’ll need to help them find bigger and better roles which means pushing them off your team and into an area where there are bigger challenges for them to tackle. This notion of promoting them internally is a key to retaining them in your organization. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: Do leaders in your organization “hoard” talent?

  • Constantly — they never let go of their good people: 18.92%
  • Sometimes — they let good people move to new roles when forced to: 46.72%
  • Rarely — good talent can flow pretty easily: 30.12%
  • Never — our leaders are great at rotating talent: 4.25%

Be a Net Exporter of Talent. While it’s hard to lose a high performer, holding onto them and hoarding them is bad for everyone involved – them, the organization, and you. For them, it stunts their career growth. Eventually they’ll seek greener pastures (which is bad for the organization when they depart for another company). That’s bad for you ultimately because you lose a key player and people won’t want to join your team out of fear they’ll eventually stagnate. (read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 190,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

Last week, we asked: How often are you an enabler of your team’s poor performance?

  • Never — I hold everyone accountable for their work: 14.89%
  • Sometimes — I occasionally let them get away with things: 75.84%
  • Often — I clean up their messes and they keep making them: 7.58%
  • Always — I struggle to hold them accountable for their work: 1.69%

Give them an inch… You’re the guardian of the standard. When you let your team members slide by and fix their shoddy work (or even worse – do it for them because it’s “easier for me to do it”) you’re an enabler of that bad behavior. Sure, it’s hard short-term to teach them and get them to fix their work but long term we all know it’s worth the effort. (read more…)