Welcome to Day 3 of SmartBrief’s roundup of financial news coming out of the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

Blankfein on the reality of regulation: Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein told CNBC his firm is always thinking about regulation and how it affects things like technology acquisition. On whether banks are under regulatory assault, Blankfien responded, “No choice, no problem. I don’t have to sit here and ruminate on about whether its good or its bad or I like it or not. It is what it is.”

‘Pandemic bonds’ could be a panacea for next pandemic: Gillian Tett writes in the Financial Times writes about the concept of ‘pandemic bonds’ aimed at helping finance more effective and efficient responses to global health crises. The idea, which is backed by World Bank boss Jim Kim, would see bonds issued to help governments, NGOs and other organization,. “This could help cash-strapped governments finance measures to beat disease,” Tett writes. (read more…)

Welcome to Day 2 of SmartBrief’s roundup of financial news coming out of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Scroll to the bottom of this post to watch a selection of Thursday’s panel discussions related to finance.

The Lady and the Gentleman: German Chancellor Angela Merkel might have been talking in Davos on Thursday, but everyone was listening to European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. Merkel’s call for Europe to stay the course on structural reforms was drowned out by Draghi announcing the ECB’s plan to inject $1.37 trillion into the Eurozone economy via quantitative easing. USA Today describes how many attendees at Merkel’s speech in Davos became distracted a view minutes in when Draghi’s news was announced.

Yea and Nay on European QE: Morgan Stanley boss James Gorman told Bloomberg News the ECB’s move on quantitative easing is a good thing. But according to CITY A.M., Larry Summers is not sure it is enough. (read more…)

Welcome to the first day of SmartBrief’s roundup of financial news coming out of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Scroll to the bottom of this post to watch a selection of Wednesday’s panel discussions related to finance.

Somehow … banks have survived: After years of lamenting the onslaught of post-crisis regulations, bankers in Davos still appear to be breathing. Some are even making a profit. According to DealBook, some are even lauding all that regulation. “The bulk of the regulatory reform was much needed,” said Deutsche Bank co-CEO Anshu Jain. “Our own management would have taken us on the same journey.”

What about the 99%?: The over-arching theme of last year’s coverage of Davos seemed to be the schism between the 1% and the 99%. The tone is not as palpable in this year’s coverage. But that is not to say no one is talking about income inequality. (read more…)

Swiss Franc-enstein: As if Switzerland wasn’t already expensive enough, the Swiss National Bank’s currency move just made it crazy costly. The Telegraph explains why the SNB did it … The Guardian weighs what a Swiss vacation will now cost tourists … and Bloomberg goes high-brow to dissect what it will mean for bar tabs at the upcoming World Economic Forum in Davos.

NYT explains who is that attacking Dodd-Frank: Legislation proposed in the House would reduce transparency in derivatives trading, allow large banks to keep certain risky securities two years longer than now permitted and prevent the Securities and Exchange Commission from regulating private equity firms involved in some securities transactions, writes Gretchen Morgenson.

And Jack Lew says Dodd-Frank should be protected: The Dodd-Frank Act needs protecting, not dismantling, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew writes in the Washington Post. He notes the progress the U.S. economy has made since the financial crisis and credits a substantial part of that to regulatory changes. (read more…)

Gen. Colin Powell, USA (Ret.) and legendary comedian Jay Leno share quite a history. Not only have the two spent a great deal of time together, they have each spent significant time interacting with numerous presidents. Better yet … Powell spent years working for four different presidents, while Leno spent years making fun of them.

Time with Reagan

During a joint appearance during the gala dinner at CME Group’s annual Global Financial Leadership Conference this week in Naples, Fla., Leno tried to lure Powell into revealing which of his former bosses was the best leader. Powell was too savvy to take the bait, saying each president had their own unique leadership styles. However, Powell did say he had a special place in his heart for former President Ronald Reagan. Powell shared tales of not only his most memorable dealings with Reagan in the Oval Office, but also one very special visit Powell paid to Reagan at his home in California after he had left office. (read more…)