About the author: Jennifer V. Miller | SmartBlogs

Jennifer V. Miller Career strategist Jennifer V. Miller is a former HR manager and corporate trainer who helps mid-career professionals chart the course for their next big "leap." A self-described "professional opportunity cultivator," Miller provides one-to-one and small group professional development coaching via her company SkillSource. She offers up tips for leading yourself and others at The People Equation.

Young kids speak the truth, as anyone who’s ever been called out by a preschooler can tell you. I’ll never forget the time my 3-year-old son looked at me with his innocent, big brown eyes and said, “Mama, you told me that’s a bad word. How come you just said it?” Nothing shines the light on a failed role model opportunity faster than being called on the carpet by a person who barely reaches your waist.[…] Continue Reading »

Many years ago, when I was a corporate training consultant, my client hired a translator named Antonio to work with me to convert a two-day supervisory skills training program from English to Spanish.

The participants of this class all spoke English, but said they’d be more comfortable learning in their native language. Although I hold a degree in Spanish, my Spanish-speaking skills were rusty; a person more skilled in the language was necessary to bring the training to life.[…] Continue Reading »

Is there ever a time when a senior leader can hedge a bit on a core company value? What if he or she is making a genuine effort to live that value, but consistently falls short? And, what if that employee is a key player with deep expertise in a much-needed area? When is the right time to say, “This just isn’t working out”?[…] Continue Reading »

Even though it happened over 20 years ago, the memory is vivid: While working in corporate America, I was waiting for a fax for one of my projects. Upon hearing the sound of an incoming fax, I grabbed the paper off the machine, read it, and then lost all thought of the task on which I had been so urgently focused.[…] Continue Reading »

Charlie is a charming, highly persuasive marketing executive for a growing technology company. He’s a delight to work with — until you tell him what he’s asking for isn’t possible.

Then, his charm rapidly dissipates. On a good day, you’ll get a reptilian smile with, “I’m sure someone with as many years in the business can find a way to make this work”; on a bad day, it’s a terse “just find a way.” No amount of reasoning will work with Charlie because, in his mind, there are two types of people: winners and losers.[…] Continue Reading »