About the author: John Baldoni | SmartBlogs

John Baldoni John Baldoni is chair of leadership development at N2Growth, is an internationally recognized leadership educator and executive coach. In 2014, Trust Across America named him to its list of top 100 most trustworthy business experts. Also in 2014, Inc.com named John to its list of top 100 leadership experts, and Global Gurus ranked John No. 11 on its list of global leadership experts. John is the author of more than a dozen books, including his newest, “MOXIE: The Secret to Bold and Gutsy Leadership.”

Judgment, writes Schumpeter, the business columnist for The Economist, “is too often missing from leadership studies.” The reason is that it is a topic too hard to quantify with metrics but as the Schumpeter column notes, “[J]udgment is what matters most.”

The problem is that too much reliance on the facts can lead one up a blind alley, especially when the assumptions that generate the facts are faulty.[…] Continue Reading »

Leaders should show a sense of vulnerability.

This is advice I have given to many senior leaders because it shows a sense of humanity and openness, even transparency. It brings people to them because it shows that the senior leader does not have all the answers.

But does this advice apply to those in middle management and below?[…] Continue Reading »

One of the hardest things for emerging leaders to learn is how to let go.

Entrepreneurs are notorious for falling into the do it yourself (DIY) habit. That may be good for home-repair people but not for business people. And especially not rising executives.

Well-focused leaders stay on track, in part because that’s their job, but also because their energy comes from managing the team.[…] Continue Reading »

See part 1 here.

Many people owe their careers to their ability to make small talk with senior people in their companies.

When you learn how to speak informally, you will demonstrate that you are someone who is comfortable in your own skin. And that trait is important to advancing your career.

 […] Continue Reading »

It is important to make a personal connection when you meet senior people in your organization. This is especially true when presenting to an executive team or the board of directors. Below, I discuss three things to do.

One final note: When you present to your CEO or a high-ranking executive, you need to exude a degree of confidence.[…] Continue Reading »