The first thing you need to do to get an irrational person to behave rationally is to calm yourself down so that you don’t escalate the situation with your own irrational and emotional reaction.

If you’re viewing a person as irrational, it means they’ve already succeeded in getting you upset enough to take something they’re doing or saying too personally when you shouldn’t. When that happens, a part of your middle emotional brain called the amygdala will hijack you away from thinking rationally and responding accordingly. It does so by blocking you from accessing your upper rational brain to evaluate the situation.

Thinking of someone as irrational can mean you’re feeling as if they are intentionally acting in some way just to get you upset — and then you react by becoming upset. Alternatively, if you view them as merely not rational, and don’t take their behavior personally, you will be able to take your emotionality out of the equation.…

(read more…)

Silhouettes of Business People Meeting with Social Media Symbols

Associations, organizations, corporations and schools have a challenge before them: to ensure students — regardless of gender, background or disability — learn 21st-century workplace skills. SmartBrief Education will dive into the issue Oct. 23 during an expert panel session, Equity in STEM: Taking Up the Challenge to Build an Inclusive Workforce.

Join us for insights about boosting the numbers students from under-represented populations in the STEM workforce pipeline. Our expert STEM panel includes an author and thought leader, female business leader, aerospace educator and a MakerEd educator who works with students with neurological differences.

We’ll ask the audience to discuss what they can do to step up. And we’ll ensure attendees leave with actionable best practices for preparing students for the 21st century workforce.

Register/Agenda | Meet the panelists

(read more…)

SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Leadership — tracks feedback from more than 210,000 business leaders. We run the poll question each week in our e-newsletter.

How frequently do you spend time writing (blogs, journaling, articles, etc.)?

  • Very — I write regularly every week: 16%
  • Somewhat — I’ll write occasionally as the mood strikes: 21%
  • Not at all — I’ll write only when absolutely necessary: 63%

Writing Makes You Better. Finding the time and a reason to write has many benefits – it makes you sharper, more articulate, helps you clarify your thoughts, and creates opportunities for you. It’s easy to rationalize you don’t have time or a reason to write. Reconsider that position and think through the many benefits of having a regular writing habit. Whether it’s journaling, blogging, white papers, or articles – writing will improve your skills and value to your company.

Mike Figliuolo is managing director of thoughtLEADERS, author of “Lead Inside the Box: How Smart Leaders Guide Their Teams to Exceptional Results” and “One Piece of Paper: The Simple Approach to Powerful, Personal Leadership.”

(read more…)

Connecting educators to each other has a huge impact on the learning environment. As educators build relationships, they can then share knowledge and learn from each other. And when this happens, learning improves for all students.

How can you get started? The key is to start small. Here are some ideas:

  1. Create a Pinterest account. Search for educational topics. Pinterest is a visual bookmarking system. You see pictures that link to websites containing lesson plans, articles and ideas for your classroom and curriculum.
  2. Set up a Twitter account and follow educational people and organizations. (No need to tweet, just lurk.) Suggestions: @edutopia, @ASCD, @eduleadership, @GustafsonBrad, @ShakeUpLearning, @jmattmiller.
  3. Check out Tweetdeck to organize incoming tweets. Search for and follow hashtags. Suggestions: #edchat, #mnlead, #tlap, #edtech, #edchat.
  4. Participate in a Twitterchat. Go to Education Chats and look for a Twitterchat that pertains to your classroom. Follow the Twitterchat during the specified time. If you see something interesting that looks like a link, click on it.
  5. (read more…)

The cure for presentation writer’s block

When the pressure is on to deliver a mission-critical presentation, even the most experienced presenters sometimes feel overwhelmed trying to develop valuable content. Have you found yourself falling prey to these habits?

  • Staring a blank screen and wondering how to begin
  • Feeling stuck and frantically searching the Internet for something to help you get back on track
  • Obsessing over just the right wording and making no progress

Are you nodding in agreement as your recognize this familiar pattern? We’ve all been there. The good news is, you can kick that anxiety to the curb when you know how to craft a powerful presentation that achieves results.…

(read more…)